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Pinal County

Sidewinder rattlesnake from San Tan Valley Area

Who’s Your Favorite Snake?

By | Client Education, News/ Events

These 6 contestants were collected in the San Tan Valley and Superstition Mountain area.

In honor of World Snake Day, vote for your favorite on our Facebook page.

A. “Go-fer Broke” Gopher Snake

Tan and brown blotched snake.

The Gopher Snake (also called a Bull Snake) is not venomous, but is often confused with a rattlesnake.

-Large and heavy-bodied, the gopher snake typically reaches 4 feet in length

-Because of its similar body markings and behavior when threatened (hissing, tail shaking and strike –posturing) it is frequently mistaken for a rattlesnake

-But a tapered tail, the absence of a rattle, the lack of a facial pit, and the round pupils all distinguish the gopher snake from the rattlesnake.

-A good climber, the gopher snake is active mainly during the day, except in extreme heat.

-.A constrictor, its prey is mostly mammals, although birds and their eggs are also eaten.

B. “Diamond Dave” Diamondback

Diamondback Rattlesnake, coiled and ready strike.

Diamondback Rattlesnake, coiled and ready to strike. Most commonly encountered rattlesnake in San Tan Valley.

-The Western diamondback rattlesnake ranging from 3-5 feet long, is a heavy-bodied snake with a triangular shaped head and two dark diagonal lines on each side of its face running from the eyes to its jaws.

-Its venom is actually a toxic saliva: a mixture of enzymes that destroys blood or paralyzes nerves.

-Western diamondbacks are pit vipers which means that they have a heat sensing pit behind each nostril that can detect differences in temperature as little as a fraction of a degree apart. The heat given off by an animal is detected by the snake helping it to determine predator from prey.

-Mice, rats, rabbits, gophers, ground dwelling birds, lizards and other small animals make up the diet of this snake. But diamondbacks also have many predators such as eagles, hawks, roadrunners, king snakes, coyotes, bobcats and fox.

-During the heat of the day diamondbacks will remain coiled in the shade of shrubs or rocks, while in winter, they retreat into caves or similar places to hibernate.

-Its rattle is made up of keratin (the same protein hair and fingernails are made of) and a new segment is added each time a rattlesnake sheds

-Male rattlesnakes engage in ritualistic combats during the spring mating season presumably to determine the sexual fitness of a male.

C. “Carol” Coral Snake

Beautiful red, black and pale yellow banded coral snake.

Beautiful red, black and yellow banded coral snake. Very secretive and rarely seen.

-The Arizona coral snake is a slender, small snake reaching only 13 to 21 inches.

-It is a brightly colored snake with broad alternating bands of red and black separated by narrower bands of bright white or yellow which completely encircle the body

-A secretive snake, it usually emerges after sundown, feeding primarily on blind and black-headed snakes. Occasionally it eats lizards or other small, smooth-scaled snakes.

-While its venom is similar to that of the cobra, because it is small with small front fixed fangs the venom does not pose as much danger to humans as that of rattlesnakes.

-Many people use a rhyme to identify a coral snake-“red on yellow kill a fellow, red on black venom lack”

D. “Longnose Rose” Longnose snake

Black and yellow banded snake with some red highlights.

Longnose Snake has a banded appearance like many other snakes in our area. It is nonvenomous.

-This slender snake varies considerably in pattern and coloring, reaching lengths of slightly over 3 feet.

-It is sometimes confused with the venomous coral snake because of its similar color banding pattern but can be distinguished by its long nose and banding that does not completely encircle it body.

-When disturbed, the longnose snake writhes and twists its body, vibrates its tail, and defecates feces and blood from its anal opening.

-An excellent burrower if the soil is sandy, it can also retreat under rocks or into rock crevices or rodent burrows,

-Active primarily at night, it feeds on lizards, lizard eggs, small snakes, small mammals, and birds.

E. “Sid” Sidewinder

The sidewinder's brown, black and tan blends in well with the desert floor.

The sidewinder coloration blends in well with its sandy surroundings. It can be a “feisty” rattlesnake.

-This small rattlesnake about 2 feet long can be tan, cream, or light gray with a dark stripe extending from the eye to above the corner of the mouth. Its coloring often matches the soil or sand on which the snake lives.

-During mild spring days it is out and about but seeks shelter in underground burrows during the hot summer months, only coming out at night

-In sandy areas this snake often coils partially buried in the sand, with only its head exposed.

-Its name is derived from its distinctive method of moving sideways with its body winding through an “S” shaped curve leaving distinctive parallel J-shaped tracks in the sand.

-As with other “pit-vipers” the sidewinder uses the heat sensing pits on each side of the face between the eye and nostril to detect warm-blooded predators and prey. –

An ambush hunter, the sidewinder coils and waits for unsuspecting lizards, mice, birds, and snakes to wander within striking distance.

F. “Lionel” Lyre Snake

The grayish banded lyre snake has a pattern on top of its head that resembles the musical instrument.

The lyre snake is named for the pattern on the top of its head that resembles the musical instrument. While mildly venomous, it does not pose a serious threat to pets.

– Named for the V-shaped marking on its head that looks like the musical instrument

-This mildly venomous, rear-fanged snake is about 4 feet in length

-Lives in rocks, crevices and fissures -Feeds primarily on lizards, but also eats birds and bats.

-Primarily nocturnal, it is seldom active during the day.

-When alarmed, the lyre snake will raise up, shake its tail, hiss, and strike, biting the intruder if not left alone. This behavior, sometimes causes the lyre snake to be mistaken for a rattlesnake.

 

 

Do you know what to do if a rattlesnake bites your pet?

Bonnie’s Parents knew exactly what to do.

Questions??  Call or TEXT us at 480-987-4555.

Your San Tan Valley Vets at       Johnson Ranch Animal Clinic.

A small black kitten being held up

CALLING ALL CAT LOVERS! JUNE IS “ADOPT-A-CAT” MONTH

By | Client Education, News/ Events

 Looking to adopt a cat this month?

 

1. Check state shelters and rescue groups.  Pinal County Animal Control is a great place to adopt a cat or kitten.

2. Consider adopting an older cat. An adult cat is usually already socialized and trained and just need a loving home to live out the rest of their lives

3. Prepare everyone in the house- both two-legged and four-legged -for the new addition. Try to get as much history and information as possible about the cat you are considering to make sure the newcomer is a good fit for your household.

4. Stock up on supplies you will need before the cat arrives. This includes bedding, food and water bowls, toys (appropriate for safety and age) and litter boxes.

5. Consider the expenses involved, both short and long term costs. This includes medical exams vaccines, spaying or neutering, a microchip, and ID tags, as well as food and bedding.

A beautiful striped cat up for adoption.

Dionne is a year old cat up for adoption at Pinal County Animal Control

6. “Cat-astrophe” proof your home. No poisonous house plants, no string, ribbon, tinsel or small objects within reach! Get a cat tower or a scratching post for cats to use it instead of your leather furniture!

7. Socialize your cat or kitten once they have become accustomed to your home and family. You want to live with a social cat not a wildcat or a scaredy-cat.  Socialize your kitten with this information: Socialize Your Kitten.

 

 

If you can’t adopt here are some ways to still get your “Cat Fix”

 

1. Donate supplies and goods to your local animal rescue or shelter. Food, blankets, litter and litter boxes, cat toys, towers and kennels are always welcome. You can drop these at Johnson Ranch Animal Clinic, if more convenient, and we will see that they get to Animal Control.

2. Spread the word on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram. Social media can reach many more potential cat adopters

3. Help out a stray cat or kitten. Even if you can’t catch it, you can leave water and shade on your patio.

4. Volunteer at your local humane society, animal shelter or rescue organization.

Cute cat up for adoption

This year and half old cat is up for adoption at Pinal County Animal Control

 

Adopting a new cat or kitten means not only did you save one life but you opened up a space at a shelter for another cat looking for a home! For more links on adopting a cat this month please click here: American Humane Society-Adopt a cat month.

 

Your Pets Can Be “Santa Paws” and “Santa Claws”

By | Uncategorized

Johnson Ranch Animal Clinic is holding their annual Pinal County Holiday Shelter Drive to support Pinal County Animal Care and Control, a caring, compassionate shelter for lost and homeless pets. Their staff works tirelessly all year round in an effort to make a difference in the lives of the animals they care for. Now, during the holiday season, your pet can help a homeless cat or dog too, by donating the following items to their less fortunate four-legged friends:

  •             Canned dog and cat food
  •             Cat litter
  •             Pet beds of all sizes for both dogs and cats
  •             “Off the floor” small pet beds made with PVC pipe or similarand mesh, cleanable bed mats.
  •             Blankets
  •             Gift certificates in any amount for Walmart or Sam’s Club  (to buy food and supplies for the animals).

From now through January, bring one or more of the items listed above to Johnson Ranch Animal Clinic during regular business hours. We’ll thank your pet with a little gift. You can also have your pet’s picture taken with Santa Claus.

Johnson Ranch Animal Clinic is located at 270 E Hunt Hwy, suite 4, at the corner of Bella Vista and Hunt Highway

Hours:           

Monday           8 am to 5 pm

Tuesday           8 am to 5 pm

Wednesday     4 pm to 8 pm

Thursday         8 am to 5 pm

Friday              8 am to 5 pm

For more information call 480-987-4555 or visit our website at www.santanvalleyvets.com

Contact Us

270 East Hunt Hwy, Ste. #4
San Tan Valley, AZ 85143
480-987-4555