Tag

Johnson Ranch Animal Clinic

Why Do Cats Like Catnip?

By | Behavior

Not every cat is sensitive to catnip which is an herb.

Only about half of all cats are genetically disposed to respond to the active oil in catnip. It is not certain what part of the brain is stimulated by this ingredient, but it is not harmful and can be used to help increase their use of items like scratching posts. Found in many cat treats it can encourage play. The aroma of catnip is thought to be quite pleasurable to cats.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Why Do Cats Knead?

By | Behavior

This instinctual behavior is left over from kittenhood when cats knead on the mother to stimulate the production of milk.

In adult cats it can be a sign of contentment, a form of stretching, or a way to get attention.

Kneading might also just feel good to the cat.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Why Do Cats Purr?

By | Behavior

Purring is caused by the vibration of vocal cords due to neurological stimulation from brain activity.

The purpose is unknown, but it does seem to be associated with pleasurable activity. Cats can also purr when they are sick or hurt.

Purring also reinforces human response; people like hearing their cat purr so they pet it more. Cats usually purr when they are with someone they like or experiencing a pleasant sensation.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Why Do Cats Sleep So Much?

By | Behavior

One reason cats sleep so much is for energy conservation.

They use a special kind of sugar to fuel their bursts of energy. It takes time to restore this energy.

Cats sleep an average of 16 to 18 hours a day, but they tend to sleep in short increments of 10 to 30 minutes, hence the term, “cat nap”!
 


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Why Do Cats Dislike Car Travel?

By | Behavior

Some people say the hardest part about a cat’s appointment at the vet is first getting them out of the house.

Unlike dogs, cats don’t like to leave their familiar surroundings. Even the presence of their owners does not reassure them because in a new environment, like a car, which sounds and smells strange to them, they can’t know what might happen. Also, cats have a very acute sense of balance, so the car’s motion might upset them.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Why Does My Cat Lick Me?

By | Behavior

Many people believe their cat licks them as a sign of affection. That may be true, but cats can lick for other reasons.

Just as they urinate on things to mark their territory, when they lick you or rub against you it’s a way of saying you belong to them.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Why Do Cats Like Boxes?

By | Behavior

It’s a matter of security.

Cats like to hide and yet be able to see what is going on around them.

Just like their ancestors 10,000 years ago, cats want to avoid being seen by their prey or chased by their predators. A box’s sides protect them while the opening gives them the opportunity to safely view the situation.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Brown and white cat with white maltese dog at the vet

New Faces-New Places: An Education in Socialization

By | Behavior

“We just can’t take you anywhere!”

Have you ever said this to that friend who always does the wrong thing, is out of control, doesn’t fit in and messes up every situation? What if that “friend” is your dog?

If you have a puppy it’s important to expose him to a variety of people and places early on so nothing comes as a big scary surprise. But success can be all about timing.

Get on Board with Socialization Before that “Training Train Has left the Station

The goal of socialization is to have a dog with a good stable personality . . . a “superdog” . . . one that’s part of the family, is a good neighbor, and plays well with others, both two legged and four legged.

The optimal socialization period for puppies is between 3 and 12 weeks. This is when they learn rules and behaviors, and what is expected of them as a dog.

If the pup has the wrong experiences or misses these experiences altogether they may not have the tools needed to accept both dogs and humans and learn to live in both worlds.

For example if you take a puppy from the litter too soon he won’t learn “dog” lessons such as bite inhibitions or “play with me” posturing. You may end up with aggression problems because he’s not used to interacting with other dogs.

Similarly if a dog is only around other dogs he may not have developed the ability to bond with humans.

Generally, there is a 6-12 week window which is the secondary time frame to socialize the dog to humans. If that process is delayed it may be impossible to socialize.

So by 12 weeks, a puppy should be able to meet new and different people in a variety of situations without fear or aggression.

Socializing is not that hard and can be done through repetitive play, speech and touch. That’s called habituation, which is getting a dog used to stuff.

Of course it’s hard to anticipate every situation your dog might encounter.

Our dog Foxy, calm and relaxed in most settings is not bothered at all by the noisy vacuum cleaner, even when it gets close to her. But she was terrified the first time a locomotive train with a loud horn went by. And while cows don’t faze her she is uncomfortable around horses.

Even our lizard showed intense dislike to any man wearing a hat.

But familiarity breeds content. So get out there and take your dog with you.

But this does raise another issue.

Does the optimum period for socialization conflict with the conventional wisdom of keeping other dogs away from young puppies who are susceptible to diseases? We’ll answer this question in the next installment:

In the House, On the Porch, In the Yard, At the Park –How Far Should A Pup Go?


Have a question about your pet or its behavior?
Contact us at Johnson Ranch Animal Clinic by
texting or calling 480-987-4555.


Why Does My Cat Bite Me?

By | Behavior

So, you’re happily petting the cat who seems to be enjoying the activity when all of a sudden, he bites you.

Sometimes called “Love Biting” or more formally, “petting-induced aggression,” it may occur for several reasons.

The cat decides he wants to control the situation (known as status-induced aggression). Or after prolonged petting, a negative stimulus triggers the response. Or the cat may just be telling you he’s had enough.

The trick is to recognize the subtle warning signs before the bite happens.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Contact Us

270 East Hunt Hwy, Ste. #4
San Tan Valley, AZ 85143
480-987-4555