Tag

Behavior

Why Do Cats Knead?

By | Behavior

This instinctual behavior is left over from kittenhood when cats knead on the mother to stimulate the production of milk.

In adult cats it can be a sign of contentment, a form of stretching, or a way to get attention.

Kneading might also just feel good to the cat.


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Why Do Cats Purr?

By | Behavior

Purring is caused by the vibration of vocal cords due to neurological stimulation from brain activity.

The purpose is unknown, but it does seem to be associated with pleasurable activity. Cats can also purr when they are sick or hurt.

Purring also reinforces human response; people like hearing their cat purr so they pet it more. Cats usually purr when they are with someone they like or experiencing a pleasant sensation.


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Why Do Cats Sleep So Much?

By | Behavior

One reason cats sleep so much is for energy conservation.

They use a special kind of sugar to fuel their bursts of energy. It takes time to restore this energy.

Cats sleep an average of 16 to 18 hours a day, but they tend to sleep in short increments of 10 to 30 minutes, hence the term, “cat nap”!
 


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Why Does My Cat Lick Me?

By | Behavior

Many people believe their cat licks them as a sign of affection. That may be true, but cats can lick for other reasons.

Just as they urinate on things to mark their territory, when they lick you or rub against you it’s a way of saying you belong to them.


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Why Do Cats Like Boxes?

By | Behavior

It’s a matter of security.

Cats like to hide and yet be able to see what is going on around them.

Just like their ancestors 10,000 years ago, cats want to avoid being seen by their prey or chased by their predators. A box’s sides protect them while the opening gives them the opportunity to safely view the situation.


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Why Does My Cat Bite Me?

By | Behavior

So, you’re happily petting the cat who seems to be enjoying the activity when all of a sudden, he bites you.

Sometimes called “Love Biting” or more formally, “petting-induced aggression,” it may occur for several reasons.

The cat decides he wants to control the situation (known as status-induced aggression). Or after prolonged petting, a negative stimulus triggers the response. Or the cat may just be telling you he’s had enough.

The trick is to recognize the subtle warning signs before the bite happens.


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Why Do Cats Eat Grass?

By | Behavior

Although cats are carnivores they do like to eat grass.

While not fully understood, eating grass is a normal behavior.

The general consensus is that it aids in moving food or hairballs through the digestive system, either up or down, since eating grass often results in vomiting. Grass may also provide cats with essential trace elements in their diet.


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A small black kitten being held up

CALLING ALL CAT LOVERS! JUNE IS “ADOPT-A-CAT” MONTH

By | Client Education, News/ Events

 Looking to adopt a cat this month?

 

1. Check state shelters and rescue groups.  Pinal County Animal Control is a great place to adopt a cat or kitten.

2. Consider adopting an older cat. An adult cat is usually already socialized and trained and just need a loving home to live out the rest of their lives

3. Prepare everyone in the house- both two-legged and four-legged -for the new addition. Try to get as much history and information as possible about the cat you are considering to make sure the newcomer is a good fit for your household.

4. Stock up on supplies you will need before the cat arrives. This includes bedding, food and water bowls, toys (appropriate for safety and age) and litter boxes.

5. Consider the expenses involved, both short and long term costs. This includes medical exams vaccines, spaying or neutering, a microchip, and ID tags, as well as food and bedding.

A beautiful striped cat up for adoption.

Dionne is a year old cat up for adoption at Pinal County Animal Control

6. “Cat-astrophe” proof your home. No poisonous house plants, no string, ribbon, tinsel or small objects within reach! Get a cat tower or a scratching post for cats to use it instead of your leather furniture!

7. Socialize your cat or kitten once they have become accustomed to your home and family. You want to live with a social cat not a wildcat or a scaredy-cat.  Socialize your kitten with this information: Socialize Your Kitten.

 

 

If you can’t adopt here are some ways to still get your “Cat Fix”

 

1. Donate supplies and goods to your local animal rescue or shelter. Food, blankets, litter and litter boxes, cat toys, towers and kennels are always welcome. You can drop these at Johnson Ranch Animal Clinic, if more convenient, and we will see that they get to Animal Control.

2. Spread the word on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram. Social media can reach many more potential cat adopters

3. Help out a stray cat or kitten. Even if you can’t catch it, you can leave water and shade on your patio.

4. Volunteer at your local humane society, animal shelter or rescue organization.

Cute cat up for adoption

This year and half old cat is up for adoption at Pinal County Animal Control

 

Adopting a new cat or kitten means not only did you save one life but you opened up a space at a shelter for another cat looking for a home! For more links on adopting a cat this month please click here: American Humane Society-Adopt a cat month.

 

DRIVEN TO DRINK

By | RIKKI "Tails"

“Tails” from the Vet Clinic

DRIVEN TO DRINK

by Rikki Schmidt

One day a golden retriever was brought into the clinic by a concerned couple. The beautiful animal, named Sunny, appeared to be in the peak of health.

“And why are we seeing Sunny today?” Marc asked as the technician led the obedient dog and his owners into an exam room.

“Well Doc,” the woman began, “he’s been drinking an awful lot of water lately. Like maybe a gallon a day.” The possibility of diabetes began to loom large in Marc’s mind.

“Is he losing weight?” Marc asked. “Does his eyesight seem to be getting worse?” While he was talking to the people he put a water dish down in front of Sunny but the dog paid no attention.

Sunny looking at the water but not drinking.

Sunny looking at the water but not drinking.

“Nope,” the man said quickly. “Nothing seems to be wrong with him at all. He’s just drinking like a fish for some reason. Like my wife said, about a gallon a day.”

Marc examined the sweet dog who was quite amenable to all the poking and prodding. “With excessive thirst,” he explained to the couple, “we always have to consider diabetes. Although Sunny doesn’t seem to exhibit any of the other symptoms.  And he didn’t drink any of the water here. I’d like to take some blood tests to see what’s going on.”

The couple readily consented so Marc drew the blood and told them he would call in a few days with the results. But two days later when the tests came back, everything was normal. It seems Sunny didn’t have diabetes or anything else. Marc asked the owners to come back for another consultation. He put a water bowl down but once again, Sunny didn’t seem interested.

“How’s Sunny doing,” he asked.

“Still drinking a gallon a day,” the husband told him.

“How do you know it’s that much?” Marc pressed for more information on this puzzling case.

“Well,” the wife explained. “You know how terrible the tap water here tastes. So we buy bottled water. And we got Sunny one of them ‘self-filling’ coolers. You know, like the kind you see in offices? The ones with the big jug on top? But instead of having to press the lever to get water, this one is set up so it automatically fills Sunny’s water dish as soon as it’s emptied. Makes it real convenient for us. But less than a week goes by and I have to replace that five gallon jug.”

“When do you notice the dog drinking?” Marc asked. “And what is he doing just before he’s drinking? Is it after he’s been walked or chased a ball?”

The woman thought for a moment “Seems like there’s no one time he drinks more than others. And I can’t tell you what he’s been doing beforehand.  We have a big fenced yard and a doggy door so he pretty much comes and goes as he pleases. I can tell you what he does right after he drinks though.”

Marc was interested “What’s that?”

“Well, you know how when you drain enough water out of them jugs, it sort of has to readjust itself with the pressure and all? Kind of makes that ‘glug’ sound and a bunch a bubbles come up?”

“Yes..” Marc said slowly.

“Well, it seems Sunny likes that part.”

“What do you mean?”

“Well, he gets real excited about it. Every time he hears that ‘glug’ and sees the bubbles he wags his tail and gets all happy. Seems like he looks forward to it. While he’s drinkin’, he’s watching the jug like he can’t wait for it to happen.”

“Really?” Marc stroked his chin as a ridiculous, yet plausible explanation began to take shape in his mind. “You think it’s possible that Sunny may be drinking all the water just to hear that glug sound?”

The husband and wife looked at each other.

“I mean it sounds almost like a learned response,” Marc continued. “Sunny knows if he drinks enough water, sooner or later he’ll see the bubbles and hear that sound he likes. So he keeps drinking to make it happen. Look, we’ve offered him water the two times he’s been in the clinic and he hasn’t touched it.”

At first, the dog’s owners sat there in silence. But then, they too, realized that, as bizarre as it sounded, Marc’s theory had possibilities.

“Well I’ll be!” the husband exclaimed. There’s nothing wrong with that dog at all.”

The wife chimed in, “yeah, he just been ‘conditioned.’ Like Pavlov’s dog.”

“More like Perrier’s dog” Marc said and they all laughed.

 

 

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