Tag

Behavior

July 4th: People Have Fun… Pets Have Fears

By | Client Education

The 4th of July can be very stressful for many pets. Some become so terrorized by the loud noises and the fireworks they panic and run away from home.

In fact, July 5th is one of the busiest days of the year for animal shelters. But while many escaped pets end up there, many others are injured, killed, or lost for good.

Include Protecting Your Pet as Part of Your Holiday Planning

  • Keep your pets inside on the 4th and don’t leave them home alone.
  • Secure the house against escapes:
    • Close all doors and windows
    • Put the pet in a “safe room” to decrease noise from the outside.
    • Use TV or music to help cover the firework noise
  • Distract your pet with toys and food puzzles
  • Try calming apparel such as Thundershirts, ear muffs, and caps
  • Consider Pheromone sprays that give the pet a feeling of well-being…
    Feliway for cats and Adaptil for dogs are available at pet stores.

Plan Ahead for the Likelihood Your Pet Does Escape

  • Before July 4, microchip your pet and have their collar and tags on.
  • Make sure the chip is registered and the contact information is up to date.
  • Take current pictures of your pet. They may be needed for posters, emails and faxes.
  • Immediately contact local animal control units, shelters, rescue groups and veterinarians.
  • Discuss desensitizing and counterconditioning your pet with your veterinarian.

What About Drugs?

  • In some cases, your veterinarian can prescribe drug therapy that may help.
  • Sedatives, tranquilizers, anti-anxiety, and other drugs have been used.
  • Don’t wait until July 3 to ask about them.
  • Drug therapy is not always successful and may need time to evaluate.
  • Drug therapy is most effective when used in combination with other recommendations.
beagle puppy laying in gravol

Avoiding Rattlesnakes

By | Uncategorized
  • Rattlesnakes are out and about when you and your pet are – early mornings, late afternoons, and early evenings.
  • Don’t let dogs get ahead on walks and explore places where snakes can hide.
  • If your pet is bitten, get to a vet right away.
  • Rattlesnake antivenin is very expensive so prevention is preferred.
  • If your dog can’t stay away from snakes consider the rattlesnake vaccine or snake-proofing your pet through a variety of snake-avoidance techniques.

If you leave your pet outside, which is not recommended, make sure the animal has a shaded area as well as plenty of water in a dish that will not tip over easily leaving him with nothing to drink on a hot day.


And remember the best cure for the Summertime Blues is . . . October!

beagle puppy laying in gravol

Desert Dangers

By | Client Education

In addition to all the usual trouble pets can get into, Arizona summers bring a host of unique situations that can make life dangerous for our furry, four footed friends.

During the warm weather pets can:

Have a Run-in with a Rattlesnake

  • During the summer, rattlesnakes are out and about when you and your pet are. Prime times are early mornings, late afternoons, and early evenings.
  • Don’t let dogs get ahead on walks and explore places where snakes can hide.
  • If your pet is bitten, get to a veterinarian right away.
  • A vial of rattlesnake antivenin is very expensive so prevention is preferred.
  • If your dog can’t stay away from snakes consider the rattlesnake vaccine or snake-proofing your pet through a variety of snake-avoidance techniques.

Tangle with a Toad

  • The large toads you see during monsoon season are Sonoran Desert toads. They excrete a substance through a gland behind the eye that acts as a neurotoxin.
  • Dogs that put these toads in their mouths can exhibit neurological symptoms including difficulty walking, seizures and paralysis.
  • Teach your dog to avoid toads.
  • If he has gotten hold of one, flush his mouth out with a garden hose. Aim the spray sideways to wash the toxin out of the mouth, not down the throat.
  • Most dogs do recover but the toxin can be life threatening.
  • If the condition worsens, see a veterinarian.
  • A toad sitting in a dog’s water bowl can also make the dog ill, so keep bowls clean.

Scuffle with a Scorpion or Spider.

  • Scorpion stings or spider bites may cause a swelling at the site and some distress.
  • They usually require no special medical attention.
  • Watch pets for the first few hours in case they exhibit a bad reaction.
  • Sometimes Benadryl is helpful in reducing symptoms. Use one milligram per one pound of pet as a guideline for dosage.

Get Into Cool Pools and Hot Spots

  • Do you have a pool . . . and a pet? Many pets love the water but even good swimmers may be bad at finding their way out so teach them where the steps are.
  • Dogs love to go for rides in the car but with this heat, if you can’t take the pet into the store with you, leave him at home.
  • Never, ever leave pets in the car, not even with the windows open.
  • Even your own yard and neighborhood has dangers.
  • Many pets get cactus spines stuck on their muzzles and elsewhere. Extracting them can be a lengthy, painful process so teach your pet to avoid them.
  • Adjust your pet’s exercise routine just as you adjust yours.
  • Walk your dog very early in the morning or at sunset or later.
  • Remember, hot pavement hurts their paws just as it would your bare feet.

If you leave your pet outside, which is not recommended, make sure the animal has a shaded area as well as plenty of water in a dish that will not tip over easily leaving him with nothing to drink on a hot day.

And remember the best cure for the Summertime Blues is . . . October!

cat kneading cushion

Why Do Cats Knead?

By | Behavior

This instinctual behavior is left over from kittenhood when cats knead on the mother to stimulate the production of milk.

In adult cats it can be a sign of contentment, a form of stretching, or a way to get attention.

Kneading might also just feel good to the cat.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


happy cat being pet

Why Do Cats Purr?

By | Behavior

Purring is caused by the vibration of vocal cords due to neurological stimulation from brain activity.

The purpose is unknown, but it does seem to be associated with pleasurable activity. Cats can also purr when they are sick or hurt.

Purring also reinforces human response; people like hearing their cat purr so they pet it more. Cats usually purr when they are with someone they like or experiencing a pleasant sensation.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


kittens sleeping on blanket

Why Do Cats Sleep So Much?

By | Behavior

One reason cats sleep so much is for energy conservation.

They use a special kind of sugar to fuel their bursts of energy. It takes time to restore this energy.

Cats sleep an average of 16 to 18 hours a day, but they tend to sleep in short increments of 10 to 30 minutes, hence the term, “cat nap”!
 


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


orange cat licking paw

Why Does My Cat Lick Me?

By | Behavior

Many people believe their cat licks them as a sign of affection. That may be true, but cats can lick for other reasons.

Just as they urinate on things to mark their territory, when they lick you or rub against you it’s a way of saying you belong to them.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


cat in box

Why Do Cats Like Boxes?

By | Behavior

It’s a matter of security.

Cats like to hide and yet be able to see what is going on around them.

Just like their ancestors 10,000 years ago, cats want to avoid being seen by their prey or chased by their predators. A box’s sides protect them while the opening gives them the opportunity to safely view the situation.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


calico kitten resting head in hand

Why Does My Cat Bite Me?

By | Behavior

So, you’re happily petting the cat who seems to be enjoying the activity when all of a sudden, he bites you.

Sometimes called “Love Biting” or more formally, “petting-induced aggression,” it may occur for several reasons.

The cat decides he wants to control the situation (known as status-induced aggression). Or after prolonged petting, a negative stimulus triggers the response. Or the cat may just be telling you he’s had enough.

The trick is to recognize the subtle warning signs before the bite happens.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


cat laying in grass

Why Do Cats Eat Grass?

By | Behavior

Although cats are carnivores they do like to eat grass.

While not fully understood, eating grass is a normal behavior.

The general consensus is that it aids in moving food or hairballs through the digestive system, either up or down, since eating grass often results in vomiting. Grass may also provide cats with essential trace elements in their diet.


Does kitty need a checkup, vaccine, or spay? Come see us about it . . .



Make an Appointment


Contact Us

270 East Hunt Hwy, Ste. #4
San Tan Valley, AZ 85143
480-987-4555